the traditional Japanese dish that brings good luck

Reading time:3 minutes, 33 seconds

If you think of Japanese food, you’ll probably think of rice and noodles, maybe soup, definitely chopsticks. Indeed, you will find this in a fairly large number of typical dishes of this country. However, Japanese cuisine, like the culture itself, comes from a long tradition of minimalism which does not necessarily mean simple. It’s true: less is more in this cuisine that strongly believes in the five basic tastes – sweet, salty, bitter, sour and umami (savory).

Japanese cuisine is both traditional and innovative, and there is a connection between ingredients and nature that literally takes cooking to the next level. This is why many dishes are raw grant luck, fortune and a new beginning.

A tradition of good fortune

If you are looking for both, Sekihan is the best option. The name might sound quite complicated, but don’t let that scare you, this easy red kidney bean and rice recipe might be just what you need to start the year.

As a giver of good luck, Sekihan finds himself during osechi ryoriie Japanese New Year food, birthdays, graduations, weddings, and even sports finals if you’re feeling particularly superstitious.

Let’s have Sekihan!

As said, rice can be found in many Japanese recipes. In this one you will need mochigome Which one is sticky rice also called sweet rice. This ingredient is essential, but if you choose to substitute it, try looking for rice with a sticky texture.

Just a few ingredients and a very easy way to cook this dish, by following this recipe, you’ll want to take a trip to Japan to strike it rich.

Ingredients:

  • ⅓ cup of adzuki beans (kidney beans).
  • 5 cups of water (prepare two cups: 1½ and 3½).
  • 2 cups sticky rice (mochigome).
  • 1 tablespoon of kosher salt.
  • 1 tablespoon of black sesame seeds.

Preperation:

  1. Place the fresh kidney beans in a colander and rinse them under cold running water.
  2. In a large saucepan, add the adzuki beans and pour 1 ½ cups of water. Bring to a boil over medium heat. When boiling, remove from the heat and drain the beans.
  3. Pour 3 ½ cups of water into the pan and return the beans. Turn on the heat and once it boils, turn the heat down. Cook the beans for about 25 or 30 minutes, pan covered. At this stage, check if the grains are al dentethat is to say: tender, but not too soft.
  4. Remove the pan from the heat to let the adzuki beans cool. Do not drain them until they have reached room temperature.
  5. When draining the grains, remember to reserve the water. You will use it to cook the rice.
  6. As for the rice, you will also rinse it beforehand. Place the sweet rice in a large bowl, add water, rinse gently and discard the water. Rinse the rice several times with tap water until it comes out clear.
  7. In a large saucepan, place the rice and pour the red water. And a tablespoon of kosher salt and mix.
  8. On the rice, place the adzuki beans, but do not mix them.
  9. Cover with lid and cook over medium-high heat for about 10 minutes.
  10. Once boiling, reduce heat to low and simmer for another 10 minutes.
  11. Remove from the heat and allow to steam for at least twenty minutes.
  12. Uncover and gently stir the ingredients.
  13. Then the sesame seeds should be roasted in a pan for just one minute, stirring them occasionally. Remove them from the heat and mix with salt.
  14. In an individual bowl, serve the Sakihan and garnish the dish with the mixture of seeds and salt.

Additional tips:

  • Note that you can also cook it in a rice cooker, if you have one, and the process is quite similar, but you should check the time settings in your device.
  • For meal preparers, you can cook and store this meal up to two days in an airtight container in your refrigerator.

Honor this beautiful culture, try this delicious dish and verify this (maybe not so much of a myth) good luck meal for you.

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Ralph Garcia

Ralph Garcia

CEO NGSC Sports

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